How to tie silk ties

How to tie silk ties


There are three main knots used to tie silk ties.
  • The Four-in-Hand knot
  • The half-Windsor knot
  • The Windsor knot (also wrongly called the "double-Windsor"). The Windsor knot is the thickest knot of the four, since its tying has the most steps.

The Four-In-Hand knot is worn long and straight and is suited to a standard shirt collar.

Four in Hand Tie Knot step 1

1) Start with wide end of the tie on your left and extending a foot below narrow end.

Four in Hand Tie Knot step 2

2) Cross wide end over narrow and back underneath.

Four in Hand Tie Knot step 3

3) Continue around passing wide end across front of narrow once more.

Four in Hand Tie Knot step 4

4) Pass side end up through loop.

Four in Hand Tie Knot step 5

5) Holding front of knot loose with index finger, pass wide end down through loop in front.

Four in Hand Tie Knot step 6

6) Remove finger and tighten knot carefully. Draw up tight to collar by holding narrow end and sliding knot snug.

The Half-Windsor knot is a medium symmetrical triangle and is suitable for standard shirt collars.

Half-Windsor knot step 1

1) The wide end should extend about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wide end over the narrow end.

Half-Windsor knot step 2

2) Bring the wide end around and behind the narrow end.

Half-Windsor knot step 3

3) Bring the wide end up.

Half-Windsor knot step 4

4) Pull the wide end through the loop.

Half-Windsor knot step 5

5) Bring the wide end around front, over the narrow end from right to left.

Half-Windsor knot step 6

6) Again, bring the wide end up and through the loop.

Half-Windsor knot step 7

7) Bring the wide end down through the knot in front.

Half-Windsor knot step 8

8) Using both hands, tighten the knot carefully and draw it up to the collar.

The Windsor knot is wide and triangular and suitable for wide spread shirt collars

Windsor Knot step 1

1) The wide end should extend about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wide end over the narrow end.

Windsor Knot step 2

2) Bring the wide end up through the loop between the collar and your tie, then back down.

Windsor Knot step 3

3) Pull the wide end underneath the narrow end and to the right, back through the loop and to the right again so that the wide end is inside out.

Windsor Knot step 4

4) Bring the wide end across the front from right to left.

Windsor Knot step 5

5) Pull the wide end up through the loop again.

Windsor Knot step 6

6) Bring the wide end down through the knot in front.

Windsor Knot step 7

7) Using both hands, tighten the knot carefully and draw it up to the collar.

 
Windsor knot video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DhxkpXAiZM&feature=fvst
 
 
 
Interesting facts about silk neckties

A good quality silk tie requires approximately 110 silkworm cocoons.

Around the whole world, the silk tie is considered to be the most popular fatherís day gift.

A person who collects ties is known as Grabatologist.

The silk necktie originated from a silk scarf that used to be worn by Croatian soldiers and it later came to be known as cravate.

The English developed neckwear so thick that they could even stop a sword thrust and merely touching a manís tie knot was a cause for a duel.

It is possible to buy a bulletproof tie that can even stop a 9mm bullet, although not from Silkworm.

Shih Huang Ti, the first Chinese emperor wore a tie as long ago as 210 B.C.

Al Pacino won the Tony Award for the best supporting actor in the play "Does a tiger wear a necktie?"